Dr. John C. Comisi

– Dr. Comisi practiced general dentistry successfully in Ithaca, NY for 35 years before relocating to Charleston, South Carolina in August 2017 to join the faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine with an appointment as an Assistant Professor.

– He is now an Associate Professor and is the Course Director for the College’s Operative II (adhesive and esthetic dentistry) Course and Chair of the Oral Rehabilitation Department’s Dental Materials Committee.

The Battle of De-Bond: Overcoming Dentistry’s Greatest Challenges

For years the dental profession has been struggling with providing effective long-term preventive and direct restorative solutions for our patients with resin-bonding of composite restorations. Are restorative materials currently available that can really help with this attempt to heal the damaged structure that caries has affected? Can there really be the creation of materials that can withstand the extreme hostile forces encountered day to day in the oral cavity and still provide a basis to promote a return to health in a biomimetic, beneficial manner?

Dr. John C. Comisi

– Dr. Comisi practiced general dentistry successfully in Ithaca, NY for 35 years before relocating to Charleston, South Carolina in August 2017 to join the faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine with an appointment as an Assistant Professor.

– He is now an Associate Professor and is the Course Director for the College’s Operative II (adhesive and esthetic dentistry) Course and Chair of the Oral Rehabilitation Department’s Dental Materials Committee.

The Battle of De-Bond: Overcoming Dentistry’s Greatest Challenges

For years the dental profession has been struggling with providing effective long-term preventive and direct restorative solutions for our patients with resin-bonding of composite restorations. Are restorative materials currently available that can really help with this attempt to heal the damaged structure that caries has affected? Can there really be the creation of materials that can withstand the extreme hostile forces encountered day to day in the oral cavity and still provide a basis to promote a return to health in a biomimetic, beneficial manner?