Dra. Tijana Lainovic

– Postdoctoral research fellow

– Faculty of Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Novi Sad

– Her research focuses on biophotonics in dentistry, materials science in dentistry, operative dentistry and endodontics (dental biomaterials characterization, dental nanomaterials, atomic force microscopy and nonlinear microscopy techniques in dental research, fractal analysis of dental materials’ surface, 3D printing in dentistry).

– Dr. Tijana Lainović has participated in numerous national and international scientific meetings. She has published scientific papers in leading peer-review national and international journals.

– She participates in the COST Action entitled, Brillouin Light Scattering Microspectroscopy for Biological and Biomedical Research and Applications”, project supported by the European Union.

– Currently, she is conducting a research concerning the morphological analysis of dentin and dental tissues with the team of researchers from the Institute of Physics Belgrade (IPB), using two-photon excitation microscopy and second and third harmonic generation.

– She also study the interaction of femtosecond laser with dental tissues in IPB.

Brilloun light scattering spectroscopy – A new method applied in dental research for non destructive mechanical mapping 

Brillouin scattering, firstly reported by Leon Brillouin, is an inelastic light scattering caused by the density fluctuations produced by the thermally excited coherent longitudinal sound waves. Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy (BLS) measures spectral changes of coherent incident light and frequency shift caused by this interaction, at hypersonic frequencies (0,10-100 GHz). The information obtained by this technique is associated to the viscoelastic properties of the tested matter. We determined values over the caries progression in dentin, and the BLS has been shown to be a method capable to differentiate caries from healthy dentin in microscopic resolution. Additionally, we tested hybrid layer dentin-adhesive interfaces, and the BLS was able to structurally reconstruct the morphology of these interfaces, based on different viscoelastic responses of their components detected by BLS. The BLS, as our results have shown, could be considered as a new complementary method in dental research and potentially in dental practice.

Dra. Tijana Lainovic

– Postdoctoral research fellow

– Faculty of Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Novi Sad

– Her research focuses on biophotonics in dentistry, materials science in dentistry, operative dentistry and endodontics (dental biomaterials characterization, dental nanomaterials, atomic force microscopy and nonlinear microscopy techniques in dental research, fractal analysis of dental materials’ surface, 3D printing in dentistry).

– Dr. Tijana Lainović has participated in numerous national and international scientific meetings. She has published scientific papers in leading peer-review national and international journals.

– She participates in the COST Action entitled, Brillouin Light Scattering Microspectroscopy for Biological and Biomedical Research and Applications”, project supported by the European Union.

– Currently, she is conducting a research concerning the morphological analysis of dentin and dental tissues with the team of researchers from the Institute of Physics Belgrade (IPB), using two-photon excitation microscopy and second and third harmonic generation.

– She also study the interaction of femtosecond laser with dental tissues in IPB.

Brilloun light scattering spectroscopy – A new method applied in dental research for non destructive mechanical mapping 

Brillouin scattering, firstly reported by Leon Brillouin, is an inelastic light scattering caused by the density fluctuations produced by the thermally excited coherent longitudinal sound waves. Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy (BLS) measures spectral changes of coherent incident light and frequency shift caused by this interaction, at hypersonic frequencies (0,10-100 GHz). The information obtained by this technique is associated to the viscoelastic properties of the tested matter. We determined values over the caries progression in dentin, and the BLS has been shown to be a method capable to differentiate caries from healthy dentin in microscopic resolution. Additionally, we tested hybrid layer dentin-adhesive interfaces, and the BLS was able to structurally reconstruct the morphology of these interfaces, based on different viscoelastic responses of their components detected by BLS. The BLS, as our results have shown, could be considered as a new complementary method in dental research and potentially in dental practice.